Scott’s Guest Blog at The Vinyl District, Weeks 9-10

It’s been a couple weeks since one of these Vinyl blog updates here on The Masterdisk Record. Last week (Week 9) we posted an interview Scott did with Tony Dawsey about his vinyl cutting experience. This week (Week 10) Scott gets deeper into the specs for vinyl set by the RIAA and answers the question “How many grooves are there on a typical record?”

Week 10: How many grooves are there on a typical record?

Week 9: An interview with master cutting engineer Tony Dawsey.

Week 8: What happened to my masters?

Week 7: How quiet are your records?

Week 6: Is your turntable cartridge doing a good enough job for you?

Week 5: All about the RIAA EQ curve: the standard that made the LP possible.

Week 4: All About the Groove, Part 2: the stereo cut explained.

Week 3: All About the Groove, Part 1: a really close look at some grooves.

Week 2: An appreciation of the vinyl aesthetic.

Week 1: Introduction: the basics of cutting records.

Downtown Musicians Come Together for Japan

In case you haven’t heard about this. 5 concerts for Japan in NYC!

From John Zorn:

We are all overwhelmed by the tragic devastation that has been happening in Japan and want to do what we can to help. These 5 benefit concerts came about because of people’s selfless generosity and open hearts—because of the power of friendship and love. Events of this kind do more than raise money, they bring people together and help us to heal. Please join us. —John Zorn

MARCH 27 at MILLER THEATRE

8pm
JOHN ZORN
CIBO MATTO
MEPHISTA
MIKE PATTON & URI CAINE
MARC RIBOT
SONIC YOUTH
YOKO ONO & SEAN LENNON

Miller Theatre (at Columbia University)
2960 Broadway (at 116th Street)
New York, NY 10027
http://millertheatre.com/Events/EventDetails.aspx?nid=1447


APRIL 8 at ABRONS ART CENTER

6:30pm
JACK QUARTET
MILFORD GRAVES
MARK FELDMAN & SYLVIE COURVOISIER
ELLIOTT SHARP
IKUE MORI & JOHN ZORN
JAMIE SAFT AND NEW ZION TRIO
MIYA MASAOKA
AYA NISHINA and FRIENDS
ERIK FRIEDLANDER
ALHAMBRA TRIO WITH ROB BURGER
NED ROTHENBERG
MASADA STRING TRIO
GYAN RILEY
MATTHEW SHIPP
THURSTON MOORE

9:30pm
JESSE HARRIS
SEX MOB
ELYSIAN FIELDS
JG THIRLWELL’S MANOREXIA
BUKE AND GASS
VINICIUS CANTUARIA
NORAH JONES

Abrons Arts Center
466 Grand Street (at Pitt Street)
New York, NY 10002
http://support.henrystreet.org/site/PageServer?pagename=AACHOME_homepage


APRIL 9 at JAPAN SOCIETY

1pm
PHILIP GLASS & HAL WILLNER
LOU REED, LAURIE ANDERSON & JOHN ZORN

6pm
RYUICHI SAKAMOTO SOLO
BILL LASWELL BAND WITH GIGI

Japan Society
333 East 47th Street
New York, NY 10017
http://www.japansociety.org/event_detail?eid=10a81178

Masterdisk Presents: Quorum

At Masterdisk we don’t just master releases by bands from big labels, though that is an important part of our business. As the years have gone by, we’ve seen our independent clientele grow steadily to the point where independent artists are now a majority of our business. The music industry, despite all the doom-and-gloom, is a really interesting place to be right now.

We’ve had this idea kicking around for a while: why not write about some of the independent bands that come through our studios? We hear a lot of great music on a daily basis: quirky, intense, beautiful, heavy, slick, rough, you name it — it comes through here. So we’re going to try out our idea by highlighting a recent project that came to us via our Indie program. It’s the Russian neo-progressive rock group Quorum, and their album Klubkin’s Voyage, mastered by Graham Goldman.

Artwork for the Quorum album Klubkin's Voyage.

Graham is one of our younger, up-and-coming engineers. He’s recently worked on a number of sucessful albums for the Relapse label, by bands like Tombs, Rabbits, Broughton’s Rules, and Kill the Client. When Graham isn’t busy (which is becoming more rare) he occasionally takes on a client that comes through our Indie program. That’s how this particular gig happened: Quorum contacted us through the Indie website, and requested a free mastering sample. Graham had some time in his schedule and took the assignment.

We thought the Quorum project would be interesting to talk about because of its unusual qualities. First, the band wanted their album to have a lot of dynamic range — they didn’t care whether it was loud or not. Second, the album is essentially one long piece, which was later broken up into individual tracks. Third, it’s a concept album — essentially one long story — which, in true prog fashion, makes use of recurring themes and other classically-derived techniques. And lastly, the band’s from Russia, and we don’t have a ton of Russian clients (we’d like to have more!) — it’s interesting for us to hear what bands are doing there.

I interviewed both Graham and Quorum member Dmitry Shtatnov for this article. First up, Graham Goldman.

Masterdisk: Do you listen to much progressive rock yourself?

Graham: I listen to all kinds of stuff, so this project wasn’t really that far-out for me.

Quorum: Klubkin's Voyage, Part Two (excerpt) by Masterdisk-NYC

Masterdisk: And Quorum came to you through the Indie program?

Graham: I did do a sample for them. But they sounded like they were pretty sure they were gonna come here before I did it even. We didn’t end up using the sample on the album though. I did a different version of it for the record.

Masterdisk: Why didn’t you use the sample?

Quorum
Graham: Well usually when we do the samples, you’re really trying to catch their ear and give them what they want — we know from experience that most bands want it kinda loud and maybe more heavy-handed than I would end up doing on the rest of the project. A lot more heavy-handed actually.

Masterdisk: But they liked it.

Graham: They thought it was good — they liked the general sound of it.

Masterdisk: You’ve mentioned that the band wanted the record to be very dynamic.

Graham:
The main challenge with the record was to keep it listenable — where you’re not having to adjust the volume all the time, but it still has a huge dynamic range. They weren’t concerned with how loud it was compared to other records.

Quorum: Klubkin's Voyage, Part One (excerpt) by Masterdisk-NYC

Masterdisk: Kind of unusual, right?

Graham: Yes. That’s really unusual. I find that most of the time, even when people say they don’t want a loud record, they do. You know, you send them a record that’s not loud, and they want it louder. You’ve got to figure out what kind of music it is, be a little bit of a psychic as to what kind of volume they’re going to want. You can usually tell from the way the mixes sound.

Masterdisk: So how did you pull off the balance?

Klubkin's Voyage

Graham: I didn’t do a whole lot of compression. There’s some mild compression on there but basically it was just a matter of trying to control the loud parts a little bit and also adding some make-up gain to bring up some of the softer parts a little bit. But it was a delicate balancing act to not crush the loud parts at all and not make the soft ones too soft.

Masterdisk: Did it take a long time to do?

Graham: Yeah, I spent some time on it. He [Dmitry] had already sequenced it himself at home, so I had him send me an mp3 showing me exactly what he wanted [in terms of transitions]. I got kinda stoked once I started working on it — and really wanted to make it perfect for them. In the end they didn’t have any revisions at all — just a couple little things. The only thing we messed around with was moving some of the crossfades.

Masterdisk: As a mastering engineer, having this kind of detail come from a client is a plus?

Graham: If an artist has a very specific set of goals they’re trying to accomplish, then it’s really helpful for them to spell it out in as much detail as possible.

Quorum: Klubkin's Voyage, Part Three (excerpt) by Masterdisk-NYC

INTERVIEW WITH DMITRY SHTATNOV OF QUORUM

Masterdisk: How did you decide to use Masterdisk for your mastering?

Dmitry: When it came time for mastering, our mix engineer contacted his friend at a local studio who referred us to Masterdisk. I decided that it was the right place when I saw Genesis and Rush albums in the discography.

Masterdisk: What features were important to you in the mastering?

Dmitry: Our goal was to make sure we preserved the dynamics. Many modern albums including our personal favorites make their sound closer and closer to white noise because of the “loudness war.” It’s hard to listen more than an hour of highly compressed rock or metal. Actually I think it may even cause headaches or toothaches. Our album contains a continuous story and we wanted to make sure it would be comfortable to listen to from the beginning to very end. Of course, all other industry standards like field widening, normalization and spectrum equalization is implicit.

Masterdisk: Could you name albums that served as models for the sound of your record?

Dmitry: In the very beginning of the mix process we were influenced by some classic records of middle/late 70’s: Trick of the Tail, maybe some ideas from ELP, Zeppelin and Rush, but the final mix moved away from that.

Quorum: Books and Dreams (excerpt) by Masterdisk-NYC

Masterdisk: What are your plans for the album now that the mastering is complete?

Dmitry: We plan to release it as a CD but also plan to offer downloads. After the first two weeks of release even the least famous albums appear on torrent trackers. After that your tracks appear as paid (what a paradox!) ringtones or pseudo-legal mp3s automatically by some php-scripts. Our real goal in making a CD is to make material evidence of our existence and give some collectors something new to put on their shelves.

Masterdisk: What are your plans and goals for Quorum?

Dmitry: We plan to record some old songs, most of which will be in two languages, then make a non-conceptual but more sophisticated and dark album, and then try to write an opera or other large form. We already have detailed plans for all of this — seriously!

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Scott’s Guest Blog at The Vinyl District, Week 8

This week at The Vinyl District Scott Hull discusses the different ways that vinyl reissues get made, particularly when the original masters are lost. And for those of you who will be at SXSW next week, we’ve listed some notable vinyl events at the end of the post.

Week 8: What happened to my masters?

Week 7: How quiet are your records?

Week 6: Is your turntable cartridge doing a good enough job for you?

Week 5: All about the RIAA EQ curve: the standard that made the LP possible.

Week 4: All About the Groove, Part 2: the stereo cut explained.

Week 3: All About the Groove, Part 1: a really close look at some grooves.

Week 2: An appreciation of the vinyl aesthetic.

Week 1: Introduction: the basics of cutting records.

Scott’s Guest Blog at The Vinyl District, Week 7

What can make a mild-mannered mastering engineer bend lacquers into a V-shape over his knee in anger? What has thrown many a sane mastering engineer into a foaming stupor? Find out in Week 7 of Scott Hull’s guest blog at The Vinyl District!

Week 7: How quiet are your records?

Week 6: Is your turntable cartridge doing a good enough job for you?

Week 5: All about the RIAA EQ curve: the standard that made the LP possible.

Week 4: All About the Groove, Part 2: the stereo cut explained.

Week 3: All About the Groove, Part 1: a really close look at some grooves.

Week 2: An appreciation of the vinyl aesthetic.

Week 1: Introduction: the basics of cutting records.