Choice Cuts: Tony Dawsey on Urban Knights

Tony Dawsey mastering jazz

Choice Cuts is a blog series where we ask the question all music obsessives love to answer: “What is your essential music?” This time it’s Tony Dawsey’s turn.

He’s well known for mastering hip-hop classics, but not as many music fans know about Tony Dawsey mastering jazz. So the title Tony selected for his first “Choice Cut” might surprise some readers: Urban Knights‘ self-titled album, released on CD by the GRP label in 1995.

“That’s my favorite album of all time I’ve worked on,” Tony says. “Maybe it has something to do with it being jazz; it’s upbeat and it puts a smile on my face.”

Tony Dawsey mastering jazzThe album, which has instrumentals and vocal tunes, features a core group of Ramsey Lewis (piano), Grover Washington Jr. (saxophone), Victor Bailey (bass), and Omar Hakim (drums).

Ramsey Lewis started his career in the 50s, playing straight-ahead piano trio jazz, and scored his first hit in 1965 with the iconic soul-jazz album “The In Crowd”.

Grover Washington, Jr. started in the soul-jazz field in the 60s, and started making records under his own name in the early 70s for Motown and Verve. Like Ramsey, Grover eventually had “crossover” hits in R&B.

Victor Bailey got his first big break replacing Jaco Pastorius in Weather Report. Talk about having some shoes to fill! He’s gone on to be an extremely in-demand sideman in jazz, fusion, funk and R&B as well as a leader of his own projects.

Drummer Omar Hakim also spent some time in Weather Report, but he got his first break with Carly Simon. He made serious waves playing with David Bowie on “Let’s Dance,” and Sting on “Dream of the Blue Turtles” and has been on many hit records since, while still keeping up his fusion chops.

So “Urban Knights” is a sort of soul-jazz / R&B / pop supergroup.

“I can listen to it any time,” Tony says. “I’ll listen to it when I’m home — I can sit down and listen or it’s something that’s nice to have on when I’m doing stuff in the yard or whatever. I’ll play it in the car — though it depends on what kind of driving I’m doing. Sometimes it’s Biggie Smalls in the car! But probably not a month goes by that I don’t listen to Urban Knights. Some people will probably be surprised at that, thinking I listen to hip-hop all the time or something. I do listen to hip-hop, but I listen to a lot of other stuff too.”

Check out Tony’s profile at the Masterdisk website.

Masterdisk Remembers Lou Reed

Lou Reed TransformerI joined Masterdisk in 2010. A lifelong musician, I had also been working as a marketer in the staffing industry for 10 years. Joining the Masterdisk team was a move I was very excited about. I knew the legacy of the studio, the work of the engineers, and the parade of stars whose music had passed through the Masterdisk mastering consoles.

In my first week on the job full-time — it might have been the first day — I’m going into the men’s room, and who’s coming out, but Lou Reed.

LOU FUCKING REED.

I had that amazing sense of being in the right place (the studio, not the men’s room.) He looked older and frailer than I expected, but he had not been in great health for a while. He still looked cool though. On that occasion he was working with Scott Hull on a video soundtrack. I would see him again a number of times over the next few years.

I think I saw him once around the time of his Metallica collaboration, “Lulu,” that he mastered with Vlado Meller. Same Lou, maybe moving a little slower, still cool.

And then in the last few months I saw him a few times again, as he returned to the studio to do some extensive remastering work with Vlado. One day I was working in the back lounge of the studio, which was then next to Vlado’s room. Lou came in one day, walking very slowly. He made it to Vlado’s room, the door shut. After a little while some of the most iconic sounds in all of rock and roll started vibrating out of the walls. A famous bass line. Vocal lines that have become part of all our DNA. It was an eerie feeling knowing that the creator of those sounds was in that room next door, reviewing them. Revisiting them. Full songs were played all the way through. Some were played a few times in a row. I felt like I was eavesdropping on a very intimate moment.

Later that afternoon, after Lou left, I popped in to Vlado’s studio. “What happened in here today?” I asked. “Lou’s very happy,” Vlado said. “He said he thought his CDs sounded like shit, and he wanted it done right. We got new transfers off the master tapes, and they sound great. You want to hear an A/B?” Yes I did.

Vlado played me “Walk on the Wild Side.” The old CD against the new transfer. And the difference was astounding. The old CD sounded so thin compared to the vastness of the sound in the new transfer. The bass sounded like a BASS. It sounded like a Miles Davis or Mingus record. You could hear fingers on the strings. You could sense the size of the instrument and the size of the room it was in. It had physical force, air and space around it.

This new version sounds incredible, beautiful, startling. It choked me up. Apparently it made Lou tear up himself as he says around the 4-minute mark in this video:

I asked Vlado about his experience working with Lou.

“Lou was gracious. He had a sense of humor too,” Vlado said. “He was appreciative. He thought the sound was amazing and he was so happy. He said ‘nobody will probably buy them but I don’t give a shit.’ He was a true artist.” A&R man Rob Santos was in attendance on at least a few sessions and Lou was very appreciative of him, and the label as well, for putting up the funding to get the records to sound the way he wanted them to sound. He had a lot of appreciation and thanks to go around. Lou Reed remastered fifteen albums with Vlado over the past few months.

Scott Hull worked with Lou on a number of projects over the years as well, starting with the “Mistrial” album in 1986. Scott at that time was primarily a digital editor — that’s before DAW workstations when digital editing was an extremely specialized skill.

“The call came in in the afternoon that Lou wanted an editor, and it needed to be done that evening. He had been working on the record at another studio and they had made a digital copy of their edit. Lou listened to the original edit and the copy, and was hearing a difference in the tone. The engineer insisted that it was impossible that there was a difference, because the numbers were the same: there’s no degradation and no difference in a digital copy. Well, Lou didn’t agree. He heard a difference. And that was the end of that working relationship. He called us that day and he finished the record at Masterdisk with Bob Ludwig.”

“It’s not that Lou was so stubborn, necessarily,” Scott said. “If he felt something wasn’t right, you weren’t going to convince him that it was otherwise. He trusted his perceptions completely. He trusted his team, and if he didn’t have a very strong opinion about something he would take other people’s input. But once he knew something, that was it.”

Lou Reed New YorkScott said that over the course of his 30-plus year career, there aren’t many artists he encountered with that same level of confidence. “It’s interesting, because their music is so different, but Lou and Donald Fagen are alike in that way. So confident. So familiar and deeply in tune with the music. Donald’s emotional reaction to his music is similar to Lou’s.

The next record Scott worked on was “New York” (1989). “For Lou, it was his guitar tone,” Scott said. “It was everything. Lou’s acoustic reference, for years after, was the first minutes of ‘Dirty Boulevard’. Just like an engineer has a reference recording you bring to a new room, Lou had that. He only needed to hear a few seconds of the guitar part and he understood the room he was working in.”

The last major project Lou worked on with Scott was the remastering of “Metal Machine Music” (2010). Scott remembers, “he was passionate about it. There was nothing arbitrary about it at all.”

The project was remastering the album in both stereo and quad formats. “When we compared the new transfers to what had been released we realized that so much of the low frequency information had been eliminated when they cut the record. For whatever reason. So it was a new experience with all this low frequency energy. What do we do with it? Is it good? It certainly changed the impact. So we spent a fair amount of time going over how that change in tone impacted the listener.”

“The original was stereo,” Scott continued. “Lou and Bob [Ludwig] had worked on a quad master way back. The thing is that Metal Machine Music was a live two-track [stereo] record, so there were no other assets to put into channels 3 and 4. So what they decided to do was to take the entire recording and record it backwards, and THAT became tracks 3 and 4. We manipulated the relation between these channels quite a bit when we did the quad remaster.”

Lou Reed Metal Machine Music“What I remember most about those sessions,” Scott said, “is how emotionally draining it was to listen to the album at a decent level. Even Lou wasn’t really able to listen to the whole thing with intese focus. It just took so much energy as a listener. It’s taxing. The QC [quality control] guys had to listen to it all the way through — two passes. It wasn’t easy work. You had to stay really focused. But when you did, it took you on a journey, maybe a once-in-a-lifetime journey.”

“Lou knew that nine-tenths of the population would dismiss MMM as noise,” Scott continues, “but he opened a lot of listeners to new concepts in music. Minimalism. Maximalism. The avant-garde.”

“I got the chance to work with Lou through several different phases of his career,” Scott said. “When he was deeply into his solo career. Then when he was more focused on performance art and avant-garde music. He reminds me a little of someone else — John Zorn — in the way that most people have a singular idea about him. People have an image of Lou that he’s this ONE WAY, that he makes THIS kind of music. But he was very multi-faceted.”

“I remember when we were working on Laurie [Anderson’s] album “Homeland” (2010). Lou attended the sessions. It was a more relaxed Lou, but he was really involved in the process. It was clear that Laurie and Lou worked well together. I remember around that time their dog was having some medical problems and it was really stressful… and so there’s another completely different side of Lou. Collaborating, offering support. Worrying over his dog. He was a three-dimensional guy.

The sadness around the Masterdisk offices, and the city, and the whole music world has been palpable in the weeks since Lou’s death. There’ll never be another one like him, but we can be glad he was here. And we can continue to listen to the legacy he left behind — listen, feel and learn.

Masterdisk at AES New York 2013

AES logo for Masterdisk at AES blog postMasterdisk engineer / owner Scott Hull and mastering engineer / vinyl specialist Alex DeTurk are on panels at AES 2013. If you’re at the conference, don’t miss them!

Workshop W17
W17 – How Are We Learning Mastering: Teaching Mastering—The Next Wave
Saturday, October 19, 11:30 am — 1:00 pm (Room 1E08)
Chair: Jonathan Wyner (Berklee College of Music / M Works Mastering)
Panelists: Scott Hull, Mike Wells (Mike Wells Mastering – Los Angeles, CA)

Tutorial T22
T22 – The Vinyl Frontier
Sunday, October 20, 12:00 pm — 1:00 pm (Room 1E09)
Presenters: Scott Hull, Alex DeTurk, Chris Mara and Cameron Henry (Welcome To 1979 – Nashville, TN), Paul Gold (Salt Mastering – New York, NY).

RUSH – The Studio Albums 1989-2007 – Mastered by Andy VanDette

This week marks the release of Rush “The Studio Albums 1989-2007” box set, which includes every studio album from that period (duh) — REMASTERED — with the added bonus of the (in)famous 2002 “Vapor Trails” album remixed!

Photo of Andy VanDetteThe remastering was engineered by Andy VanDette, and the remix of Vapor Trails was by David Bottrill. It’s a great time to be a Rush fan!

We had the foresight to have cameras ready at a few of the mastering sessions (unfortunately not all of them). But we’ll share some of the behind-the-scenes shots with you here and a few comments from Andy about the mastering process.

Q: Can you compare the experience of re-mastering the Mercury catalog to the Atlantic albums?

Andy: Being the cutting edge technology band that Rush is, they were one of the first to embrace digital recording. Pushing the envelope to record 44.1 Khz 16 bit in the late 80’s seems a little short sighted today, but that probably felt pretty close to the cutting edge then. Early digital sounded very clear, but also very thin. I wish there had been analog safety copies of “Test for Echo”.

Q: Which of the Atlantic albums was the most significant for you?

Andy: “Vapor Trails”. I remember hearing it before it came out, and thinking “Wow, I guess this is why I will never work with Rush.” The snare and vocal were so overshadowed by low end.

Q: Do you have a personal favorite out of the Atlantics?

Andy: I have always loved “Snakes and Arrows”. The songs are fantastic. I can see how it turned on a whole new generation of fans. On the “Vapor Trails” tour, their fan base was guys like me. The shows I have seen the last four years have been increasingly diverse. Lots of families at the shows now. Last year I saw my first female air drummer!

Q: Which do you think improved the most?

Andy: Well… “Vapor Trails” of course. I see why they had a hard time remastering the original mixes. So much of their energy is in the bottom octave 20-40Hz. You can roll it off, but so much of the mixes’ punch came from that. It was just mixed that way. The David Bottrill remixes are very well balanced and musical.

Andy discussed remastering the first 15 Rush albums in 2011 here.

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Sting’s New Album “The Last Ship” Released Today

Sting’s new album, “The Last Ship,” his first full-length album of new material in ten years, is released today on Cherrytree / Interscope / A&M Records. The album was produced by Rob Mathes, and mastered by Scott Hull. Here’s Sting and Scott at the mastering session.

Photo of Sting with Scott Hull

The album is inspired by Sting’s forthcoming play of the same name, scheduled to debut on Broadway in 2014. It will explore the themes of homecoming and self-discovery, drawing upon Sting’s memories of growing up, with reminiscences of universal truths – the complexity of relationships, the passage of time and the importance of family and community. (Wikipedia)

Artwork of Sting The Last Ship

The album is available in multiple formats: a standard 12 song version (also on vinyl — get it at Elusive Disc), a 2-disc version with 5 extra tracks, and a super-deluxe edition with special packaging and 20 tracks available from Amazon.

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Lou Pallo’s “Thank You Les” Gets a 10 for Sound at Analog Planet

Michael Fremer at Analog Planet gave Lou Pallo’s “Thank You Les – A Tribute To Les Paul” vinyl a “9” for musical content and a “10” for sound in his recent review. Here’s what Michael had to say:

“The production was all-analog on vintage tube gear that warmed up the CD reviewed here a few months ago, but on vinyl? OMG! Anyone who thinks CDs are “transparent to the source” will surely change their minds hearing this AA recording in its most pure AAA state…”

Read the full review here.

“Thank You Les” was mastered by Alex DeTurk at Masterdisk.

Lou Pallo Thank You Les Album Cover

In addition to the great review from Michael Fremer, “Thank You Les” has earned the titles of “Best Tribute Album” and “Best Long Form Video” in the artist and industry judging portion of the Independent Music Awards, in addition to “Best Tribute Album” in the world-wide voting Vox Populi (People’s Choice).

Here’s an interview with Lou Pallo at The Independent Music Awards site.

Get the vinyl at Elusive Disc.

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New Linda Thompson Album “Won’t Be Long Now” Set for October 15 Release

Linda Thompson banner

British folk-rock legend Linda Thompson’s new album, “Won’t Be Long Now” is set for release on October 15.

Photo of Linda Thompson, Scott Hull, and Ed HaberThe album features Martin Carthy, Dave Swarbrick, Eliza Carthy, Sam Amidon, Amy Helm and a host of Thompsons. All three of her children and one grandchild form the group on a cover of Anna McGarrigle’s “As Fast As My Feet.” Ex-husband Richard Thompson provides lovely guitar accompaniment on Linda’s “Love’s for Babies and Fools,” a song that can stand with the best of their classic output.

Produced with her long-time collaborator, Edward Haber, mixed by Tom Schick (Wilco, Mavis Staples, Ryan Adams), and mastered by Scott Hull, “Won’t Be Long Now” is not to be missed.

(The photo of Linda, Scott, and producer Ed Haber is from the mastering session for “Won’t Be Long Now.”)

Coincidentally, it was 7 years ago today that Linda’s last album, “Versatile Heart” (also mastered by Scott Hull), was released!

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Cypress Hill Debut Released 22 Years Ago Today

Cypress Hill album cover

“Cypress Hill” (mastered at Masterdisk) was critically and commercially successful, getting certified double Platinum by the RIAA.

Steve Huey of Allmusic calls Cypress Hill’s debut “a sonic blueprint that would become one of the most widely copied in hip-hop.”

In 1998, the album was selected as one of The Source’s 100 Best Rap Albums. The album was included in the book 1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die.

Rolling Stone called it “an album that is innovative and engaging in spite of its hard-core messages.”

Included in Rolling Stone’s “Essential Recordings of the 90’s”.
Ranked #57 in Spin Magazine’s “90 Greatest Albums of the ’90s”.
Included in Q Magazine’s “90 Best Albums Of The 1990s”.

Data from Wikipedia.

Don Muro “It’s Time” Reissue Remastered by Alex DeTurk

Coming October 8th, 2013
Limited edition of 500 LPs

“Most lost-classic reissues fit snugly into genre ghettos, but Don Muro’s 1977 masterpiece ‘It’s Time’ defies even our precise 21st-century methods of classification. Rock, funk, synth-pop, disco, ambient, space-age: nothing suffices. It’s funny, it’s solemn, it’s light, it’s shady, it’s sly, it’s earnest, and it’s none and all of the above. Enjoy it ironically and suddenly it gets sublime; take it seriously and soon enough it’s having fun at your expense. I dare you to try to file this one away – chances are it’ll keep poking its head out of your collection, challenging you to figure it all out before it even attracts a speck of dust.” – Marc Masters (Pitchfork, The Wire)

2013 remaster by Alex DeTurk at Masterdisk

From the original 1977 back cover…

“On this album Don plays the following instruments:
ARP Polyphonic Synthesizer System (2600, Odyssey, String Ensemble)
ARP Pro-Soloist
Oberheim Digital Sequencer
Acoustic Piano
Rhodes 73 and 88 Electric Pianos
Hammond RT3 Organ
Electric and Acoustic Guitars
Bass Guitar
Drums and Percussion

Get it at Flannelgraph Records!

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