New Tzadik CDs: Zorn/Moonchild, Jesse Harris, Omer Klein

It’s Friday, and that means there’s a new Downtown Music Gallery newsletter  in my inbox! Have you heard of Downtown Music Gallery? It’s a great NYC record store currently based down in Chinatown. They carry all kinds of great experimental, eclectic, and creative avant-garde, classical, rock, jazz, prog music and everything else that doesn’t fit in to a regular category. They’re also the distributor for John Zorn’s Tzadik, a record label with which we’re closely involved — Scott Hull has mastered all the Tzadik releases since 2001.

This morning’s newsletter announces three new Tzadik albums, all of which were not too long ago playing very loudly in Scott’s studio. Here they are, along with the press releases from the label, copied directly from the newsletter. Links and more info below.

IpsissimusJOHN ZORN//MOONCHILD: MIKE PATTON/TREVOR DUNN/JOEY BARON + MARC RIBOT – Ipsissimus (Tzadik 7386; USA)  Weaving sonic dramas around the legacies of Magick and Alchemy, Moonchild is one of Zorn’s most intense and powerful projects. Active since 2006, Moonchild has released four CDs speaking directly to young, open minded and curious music lovers around the world, and their newest recording is the most varied and driving to date. Nine new duos, trios and quartets swirling with melodic and rhythmic invention featuring the searing guitar of Marc Ribot, the magical vocals of Mike Patton and Zorn’s manic sax with the astounding Dunn-Baron rhythm section. Ipsissimus  is the fifth surprising installment in the remarkable Moonchild legacy. TZADIK ARCHIVAL SERIES

CosmoJESSE HARRIS – Cosmo (Tzadik 7635; USA)  One of our greatest songwriters, Jesse Harris, is a Grammy Award winning composer whose songs have been recorded by Norah Jones, Smokey Robinson, Solomon Burke, Willie Nelson, Emmylou Harris and many others. Here he returns to his roots with a fabulous group of friends to present an instrumental program of his classic songs and some brilliant new originals composed especially for this CD. Blending folk, soul, Brazilian and rock music into his own unique and personal world, Jesse’s new CD is a joyous celebration of life, love, melody and mystery. Instrumental pop in the tradition of Burt Bacharach with a 21st century twist! TZADIK KEY SERIES

RocketsOMER KLEIN – Rockets On The Balcony (Tzadik 8156; USA)  Omer Klein is an exciting young pianist out of the Israeli-New York jazz scene. Born in Israel, he studied at New England Conservatory and now tours extensively with his own ensembles. Exotic and lyrical, his work blends Middle Eastern sounds with the spontaneity of jazz. Here he works with two of his closest collaborators in a free wheeling trio setting. Alternately driving and touching, Rockets on the Balcony is a beautiful example of how new generations are taking Jewish Music to profound and unexpected new places. TZADIK RADICAL JEWISH CULTURE SERIES

Each disc is $14 and can be ordered from the shop online. Dig in to some new sounds! Visit Downtown Music Gallery here.

We Hear More Than We’re Supposed To Hear: Mastering Steely Dan’s Two Against Nature

Steely Dan - Two Against Nature
Two Against Nature
I’ve had the pleasure over the years of working with many great artists. Watching some of the masters of our business do what they do best. It’s been a behind the scenes look, a close up, without the cameras and public attention. In this environment you really get to see who these creative people are. One of my experiences was with Donald Fagen and Walter Becker of Steely Dan.

I was mastering their Two Against Nature CD with them in my mastering room. We had spent many hours over the course of several days getting all of the songs exactly the way they wanted them. Using the right equalization, the right level, fades and timings. There was one song that Donald was not content with. We experimented with EQ frequencies and such for quite some time. What was interesting about this was that even the most minute changes in EQ had a profound impact on the mix.

Steely Dan’s songs are mostly very sparse, carefully crafted sounds blended so that the individual elements aren’t immediately apparent. In this case the overall sound of the song needed to be a little brighter, as in more “present” compared to the other tracks on the record. But when EQ was added to make it brighter, one or more of the elements of the mix moved more than the other elements. In this way the EQ changes were more like mix level changes. We eventually came to a debate over whether we should add 0.2 db of EQ at 1,400 Hz or add 0.2 db of EQ at 1,250 Hz. The difference between these two settings would ordinarily be completely inaudible to most people, unless they had trained their perception. For Donald however, who was deeply aware of how his record sounded, the difference was huge. At the first setting one of the shakers in the mix seemed to sound louder and dominated the mix in a way it hadn’t before. At the other setting the snare seemed louder, which was the intention, but it was too much. He asked me if we could split the difference, but at the time 0.2 db increments were the smallest change available and there wasn’t another option. If I recall correctly what was finally decided was to not add the EQ. The track would be a tad less present than there other tracks, but the balance between the instruments would be what he wanted.

Be very aware of how a piece of music makes you feel. While manipulating sound with modern technology, perfection is often confused with better. Good, better and best are feelings inside that are linked to the emotional reaction of the listener. Perfection is often not the most emotional or compelling attribute of a recording.


“We Hear More Than We’re Supposed To Hear” is excerpted from Scott Hull’s extensive article “Ramblings about Music from a (Not Quite Yet) Mad Mastering Engineer” in the Tzadik/Hips Road book Arcana III: Musicians on Music, edited by John Zorn. Arcana III is available from Downtown Music Gallery and other online retailers.

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Countdown to Record Store Day, Part 4: Downtown Music Gallery

Downtown Music Gallery
The entrance to Downtown Music Gallery's underground lair.
If you’re in NYC for Record Store Day tomorrow and are into experimental music, prog, jazz, avant-garde and downtown sounds, you gotta go to Chinatown and duck down into the marvelous Downtown Music Gallery.

I’ve been a big fan of this store since I first happened upon it when it was situated on 5th street off the Bowery. In fact, I was so immediately smitten with their amazing selection of Canterbury prog, obscure European experimental jazz offerings and forgotten 60s psych outfits that a few months after my first visit I walked in one day and owner Bruce Lee Gallanter looked at me and said, “you know, you’ve spent a lot of money here over the past few months — I want to thank you!” And that, dear readers, is the story of what happened to my 2002 tax refund.

I kept up my few-times-a-week visiting schedule through their next move, when they were situated on the Bowery below 3rd Street. Since then they’ve moved to Chinatown and I haven’t been able, for a number of reasons, to get down there anywhere near as much as I used to — but the love is still there!

Bruce and Manny
Bruce and Manny, Downtown Music Gallery's primary movers. (Photo by Geoff Smith, from the DMG website.)
Downtown Music Gallery is a record store lover’s record store. They guys that run the place, Bruce and Manny “Lunch” Maris are extremely knowledgeable about all kinds of music, and they’re usually willing — if they’re not too busy — to chat about any kind of obscure artist or title you like, or make a recommendation, or even occasionally play a request.

Their main categories are Downtown, Jazz, Rock/Psych/Prog, and Composition, and they offer used as well as new product. And like I said they have lots of super-obscure product on hand. Recently they’ve bought a few large prog collections, so if you’re into the prog you really should go.

Masterdisk has an important connection to Downtown Music Gallery too, since they’re the distributors for John Zorn’s Tzadik label, and Scott Hull masters all the Tzadik albums. Certainly, if you want something on Tzadik, this is the place to go. DMG has also released some great albums on their own label, DMG ARC. (Check out the Raoul Bjorkenheim / William Parker / Hamid Drake CD called DMG at The Stone — it’s powerful stuff.)

Downtown also has a cool selection of weird music books, CD box sets, shirts, hard-to-find music DVDs and other interesting odds and ends.

Though they’re not carrying much, if anything, of the limited edition items on offer for Record Store Day (most of that stuff is more mainstream then their areas of expertise), pretty much every day is Record Store Day at Downtown Music Gallery. Stop by and you won’t be disappointed.

Visit Downtown Music Gallery on at their website.