LAMC: Music Industry Tips #2

Tip #2: Exposure is the name of the game.

The conversation at LAMC panels moved into licensing. If you are interested in licensing your music, it will help to have a more complete picture about how that world works. Getting your music into the hands of licensing companies such as DMX or Lovecat Music is only one part of the puzzle. You may also have to make changes to your music to fit into a scene or rerecord a song on spec, without guaranteed pay.

Mary Nuñez of Sony Latin urged artists to always prepare instrumental tracks for use (read: master your instrumentals along with your main mixes), and keep your stems ready to hand over to the licensing companies as well.  You never know what element in your song matches a scene in a commercial or film and what will need to be pushed or downplayed in the mix. 

Nic Harcourt of KCRW agreed: “younger artists who are growing up in a different world from legacy artists, are a lot more hungry and realize that getting their music placed in TV commercials, movies, games, whatever, is probably the only way they’re going to make a living doing music right now.”

Randy Frisch at Lovecat Music and Anita Benner at DMX were particularly encouraging of artists submitting their CDs; they’re always looking for ways to bring new artists into the fold.

Regarding getting picked up as an independent Latin artist, Anita Benner said that with the growth of the Hispanic market in the U.S., clients are starting to appropriate more and more Latin music. “So, anywhere from a jewelry store that targets girls, to hallmark stores in middle America, Champs, every major fashion brand that you can think of, Victoria Secret, Best Buy, they’re all starting to incorporate Latin music in their programming. It’s really a tremendous platform,” she said, “simply walking down the street, you can’t escape us.”

DMX reaches almost 200 million people a day through various marketing venues, and as an artist, it can be a real boost to have such exposure, especially since radio play for independent artists is practically impossible.

Nic Harcourt hit the nail on the head when he said: “whether it’s placement in a commercial, or a major band that get’s their music in a TV show, or in VH1, exposure is the name of the game. It’s really frightening that the outlets and TV commercials still are a way, in some cases for breaking a band.”

The process at DMX is fairly simple: you fill out the contract in ten minutes, send in a CD and it takes up to two weeks to get into the system and then 30 days before you’re in rotation. “It’s a novelty,” says Benner, “to be able to walk into Nike or Puma or West Elm and hear your song playing.” And apparently it goes further than that. Some shoppers have turned into music bloggers who, through guesswork, post unofficial playlists for stores like Abercombie & Fitch. Within the microcosm of the shopper’s world is a growing online music community, another potential audience pool.

Josh Norek of Nacional Records recounted his surprise at placing Nortec Collective (pictured above) on a 30 second spot in a scene where Anthony Bourdain is eating tacos in Tijuana. The day after the show aired, all four of their albums were on the iTunes Latino Top 20. “And that surprised me,” said Norek, “because its a foodie show. I’ve had examples with shows like Breaking Bad, where we had a really good sales bump, but I wasn’t expecting a food show where it was just brief use. So I felt a little less bitter about the small licensing fee, because we saw a reaction where people liked the song and went on iTunes to find it.”

As an independent artist, try every route to get your music heard, because you never know what the outcome might be.