RUSH “Moving Pictures” Out Today in 5.1 Surround and Hi-Res Stereo

Great news! Out today: RUSH’s super-classic 1981 album Moving Pictures, in high-resolution stereo and 5.1 surround mixes! It comes in two formats: CD + DVD-Audio or CD + Blu-ray. Mastered by Andy VanDette at Masterdisk.

We had a YouTube teaser embedded in the post here, but it was causing issues for the whole blog in Safari! So we’re using a link now instead. Check out the teaser for the 30th Anniversary Moving Pictures CD, DVD-A and Blu-ray editions.

The pre-orders alone got the album onto the Billboard top 200 at #137. Not bad for a 30 yr old album!

Masterdisk Presents: Quorum

At Masterdisk we don’t just master releases by bands from big labels, though that is an important part of our business. As the years have gone by, we’ve seen our independent clientele grow steadily to the point where independent artists are now a majority of our business. The music industry, despite all the doom-and-gloom, is a really interesting place to be right now.

We’ve had this idea kicking around for a while: why not write about some of the independent bands that come through our studios? We hear a lot of great music on a daily basis: quirky, intense, beautiful, heavy, slick, rough, you name it — it comes through here. So we’re going to try out our idea by highlighting a recent project that came to us via our Indie program. It’s the Russian neo-progressive rock group Quorum, and their album Klubkin’s Voyage, mastered by Graham Goldman.

Artwork for the Quorum album Klubkin's Voyage.

Graham is one of our younger, up-and-coming engineers. He’s recently worked on a number of sucessful albums for the Relapse label, by bands like Tombs, Rabbits, Broughton’s Rules, and Kill the Client. When Graham isn’t busy (which is becoming more rare) he occasionally takes on a client that comes through our Indie program. That’s how this particular gig happened: Quorum contacted us through the Indie website, and requested a free mastering sample. Graham had some time in his schedule and took the assignment.

We thought the Quorum project would be interesting to talk about because of its unusual qualities. First, the band wanted their album to have a lot of dynamic range — they didn’t care whether it was loud or not. Second, the album is essentially one long piece, which was later broken up into individual tracks. Third, it’s a concept album — essentially one long story — which, in true prog fashion, makes use of recurring themes and other classically-derived techniques. And lastly, the band’s from Russia, and we don’t have a ton of Russian clients (we’d like to have more!) — it’s interesting for us to hear what bands are doing there.

I interviewed both Graham and Quorum member Dmitry Shtatnov for this article. First up, Graham Goldman.

Masterdisk: Do you listen to much progressive rock yourself?

Graham: I listen to all kinds of stuff, so this project wasn’t really that far-out for me.

Quorum: Klubkin's Voyage, Part Two (excerpt) by Masterdisk-NYC

Masterdisk: And Quorum came to you through the Indie program?

Graham: I did do a sample for them. But they sounded like they were pretty sure they were gonna come here before I did it even. We didn’t end up using the sample on the album though. I did a different version of it for the record.

Masterdisk: Why didn’t you use the sample?

Quorum
Graham: Well usually when we do the samples, you’re really trying to catch their ear and give them what they want — we know from experience that most bands want it kinda loud and maybe more heavy-handed than I would end up doing on the rest of the project. A lot more heavy-handed actually.

Masterdisk: But they liked it.

Graham: They thought it was good — they liked the general sound of it.

Masterdisk: You’ve mentioned that the band wanted the record to be very dynamic.

Graham:
The main challenge with the record was to keep it listenable — where you’re not having to adjust the volume all the time, but it still has a huge dynamic range. They weren’t concerned with how loud it was compared to other records.

Quorum: Klubkin's Voyage, Part One (excerpt) by Masterdisk-NYC

Masterdisk: Kind of unusual, right?

Graham: Yes. That’s really unusual. I find that most of the time, even when people say they don’t want a loud record, they do. You know, you send them a record that’s not loud, and they want it louder. You’ve got to figure out what kind of music it is, be a little bit of a psychic as to what kind of volume they’re going to want. You can usually tell from the way the mixes sound.

Masterdisk: So how did you pull off the balance?

Klubkin's Voyage

Graham: I didn’t do a whole lot of compression. There’s some mild compression on there but basically it was just a matter of trying to control the loud parts a little bit and also adding some make-up gain to bring up some of the softer parts a little bit. But it was a delicate balancing act to not crush the loud parts at all and not make the soft ones too soft.

Masterdisk: Did it take a long time to do?

Graham: Yeah, I spent some time on it. He [Dmitry] had already sequenced it himself at home, so I had him send me an mp3 showing me exactly what he wanted [in terms of transitions]. I got kinda stoked once I started working on it — and really wanted to make it perfect for them. In the end they didn’t have any revisions at all — just a couple little things. The only thing we messed around with was moving some of the crossfades.

Masterdisk: As a mastering engineer, having this kind of detail come from a client is a plus?

Graham: If an artist has a very specific set of goals they’re trying to accomplish, then it’s really helpful for them to spell it out in as much detail as possible.

Quorum: Klubkin's Voyage, Part Three (excerpt) by Masterdisk-NYC

INTERVIEW WITH DMITRY SHTATNOV OF QUORUM

Masterdisk: How did you decide to use Masterdisk for your mastering?

Dmitry: When it came time for mastering, our mix engineer contacted his friend at a local studio who referred us to Masterdisk. I decided that it was the right place when I saw Genesis and Rush albums in the discography.

Masterdisk: What features were important to you in the mastering?

Dmitry: Our goal was to make sure we preserved the dynamics. Many modern albums including our personal favorites make their sound closer and closer to white noise because of the “loudness war.” It’s hard to listen more than an hour of highly compressed rock or metal. Actually I think it may even cause headaches or toothaches. Our album contains a continuous story and we wanted to make sure it would be comfortable to listen to from the beginning to very end. Of course, all other industry standards like field widening, normalization and spectrum equalization is implicit.

Masterdisk: Could you name albums that served as models for the sound of your record?

Dmitry: In the very beginning of the mix process we were influenced by some classic records of middle/late 70’s: Trick of the Tail, maybe some ideas from ELP, Zeppelin and Rush, but the final mix moved away from that.

Quorum: Books and Dreams (excerpt) by Masterdisk-NYC

Masterdisk: What are your plans for the album now that the mastering is complete?

Dmitry: We plan to release it as a CD but also plan to offer downloads. After the first two weeks of release even the least famous albums appear on torrent trackers. After that your tracks appear as paid (what a paradox!) ringtones or pseudo-legal mp3s automatically by some php-scripts. Our real goal in making a CD is to make material evidence of our existence and give some collectors something new to put on their shelves.

Masterdisk: What are your plans and goals for Quorum?

Dmitry: We plan to record some old songs, most of which will be in two languages, then make a non-conceptual but more sophisticated and dark album, and then try to write an opera or other large form. We already have detailed plans for all of this — seriously!

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Scott’s Guest Blog at The Vinyl District, Week 8

This week at The Vinyl District Scott Hull discusses the different ways that vinyl reissues get made, particularly when the original masters are lost. And for those of you who will be at SXSW next week, we’ve listed some notable vinyl events at the end of the post.

Week 8: What happened to my masters?

Week 7: How quiet are your records?

Week 6: Is your turntable cartridge doing a good enough job for you?

Week 5: All about the RIAA EQ curve: the standard that made the LP possible.

Week 4: All About the Groove, Part 2: the stereo cut explained.

Week 3: All About the Groove, Part 1: a really close look at some grooves.

Week 2: An appreciation of the vinyl aesthetic.

Week 1: Introduction: the basics of cutting records.

Scott’s Guest Blog at The Vinyl District, Week 7

What can make a mild-mannered mastering engineer bend lacquers into a V-shape over his knee in anger? What has thrown many a sane mastering engineer into a foaming stupor? Find out in Week 7 of Scott Hull’s guest blog at The Vinyl District!

Week 7: How quiet are your records?

Week 6: Is your turntable cartridge doing a good enough job for you?

Week 5: All about the RIAA EQ curve: the standard that made the LP possible.

Week 4: All About the Groove, Part 2: the stereo cut explained.

Week 3: All About the Groove, Part 1: a really close look at some grooves.

Week 2: An appreciation of the vinyl aesthetic.

Week 1: Introduction: the basics of cutting records.

Scott’s Guest Blog at The Vinyl District, Weeks 5-6

We’re at about the midway point in Scott Hull’s guest blog series at The Vinyl District. Here’s a rundown of what’s been covered so far.

Photo: Knipsermann

Week 6: Is your turntable cartridge doing a good enough job for you?

Week 5: All about the RIAA EQ curve: the standard that made the LP possible.

Week 4: All About the Groove, Part 2: the stereo cut explained.

Week 3: All About the Groove, Part 1: a really close look at some grooves.

Week 2: An appreciation of the vinyl aesthetic.

Week 1: Introduction: the basics of cutting records.

Scott’s Guest Blog at The Vinyl District, Week 3

It’s week three of Scott’s guest blog series at The Vinyl District, and it’s a good one! This week Scott starts getting into the geometry of the record groove, aided by some photos from the new camera we have installed on our lathe’s scope. Hope you enjoy it!


http://www.thevinyldistrict.com/2011/02/tvds-on-the-record-with-masterdisks-scott-hull-3/

Exciting News: Matt Agoglia Is Promoted to Senior Engineer at Masterdisk

It’s only a few days into 2011 but it’s already shaping up to be an eventful year at Masterdisk HQ in New York City. Scott Hull, mastering engineer and the owner of Masterdisk, announced this week that mastering engineer Howie Weinberg has left his longtime post at the studio to strike out on his own in California, “where the climate suits his clothes” (as the old blues tune says). Scott, and the rest of the Masterdisk staff, wishes Howie the best of luck in the future.

In his place, Scott has promoted engineer Matt Agoglia to the position of Senior Engineer. Matt served as Howie’s right-hand man for three years at Masterdisk while building his own mastering clientele. Matt is taking over Howie’s mastering suite, and will continue mastering records using the same gear that he and Howie have been using for years. This classic mastering suite has been used for mastering iconic albums by The White Stripes, The Clash, Wilco, Nirvana, U2, Public Enemy, Pixies, Sonic Youth and many more.

Matt Agoglia in His Studio
Matt Agoglia in his mastering suite.

About the departure, and the promotion, Scott said, “Of course we’re sorry to see Howie go, but this is part of how the mastering business has always worked. No one stays at any one place forever. Young engineers work with senior guys, and learn the finer points of the craft. When spots open up, the younger engineers step up to move the torch forward. I started my career as Bob Ludwig’s assistant. And when Bob left Masterdisk for Maine I was promoted to Chief Engineer in his old room. Matt’s a very good engineer, and his clients have been very happy with his projects over the past few years. I have total faith that as more people get to know his mastering style, he’ll be very successful here.”

Recent records Matt has worked on include Gorillaz’ Plastic Beach, Spoon’s Transference, Wavves’ King of the Beach, and Rogue Wave’s Permalight.

Andy VanDette Discusses Mastering Porcupine Tree’s ‘In Absentia’ and ‘Deadwing’ Albums

Tape Op Magazine“I have worked with him a few times and he really cares. All you want is someone who can go the extra mile, and he has an affinity with the music. He’s a perfectionist — I once saw him discard a whole vinyl cut because he could get another half dB out of it — and I really trust him.
— Steven Wilson discussing Andy VanDette, Tape Op, Sep/Oct 2009


Porcupine Tree is one of the premiere progressive rock bands working today. They came up in the 90s along with bands like Dream Theater and Spock’s Beard, carrying the prog torch into what could be seen as the third wave of the genre. (For the sake of argument, and I’m sure there will be some, the first wave would be represented by bands like Yes, Genesis and King Crimson; the second by Marillion and IQ; and the fourth by The Mars Volta. And yes, this is a gross oversimplification which leaves out dozens of important bands and sub-movements!)

Two of Porcupine Tree’s biggest albums, In Absentia [Lava/Atlantic 2002] and Deadwing [Lava/Atlantic 2005], were mastered by Masterdisk chief engineer Andy VanDette. I spoke to Andy about his work on on these two very different records.

How did you get the Porcupine Tree gig?

Album cover of Porcupine Tree's In AbsentiaLuckily my friend Andy Karp — who became president of A&R over at Lava/Atlantic — whenever he could throw my name into the ring for mastering he would. A lot of artists have a mastering engineer that they’ve worked with before and that’s where they go. But Andy would get me shootout gigs for certain stuff — I got to do the Simple Plan demo that got them signed. I did a few records on Atlantic that never saw the light of day… and Porcupine Tree came along that way.

What can you tell me about In Absentia?

The thing about In Absentia is that was a record made the way that records used to be made. You had a big major label debut where they recorded in big studios, they hired a quality engineer to record the basic tracks, and then a mix god, Tim Palmer, to mix it all to half inch tape. I heard the first few seconds of “Blackest Eyes” and I thought, “OK, this is going to be a good day! this is going to be a day where I figure out ‘a half dB of what’ instead of “where’s the kitchen sink?”

Was Steven [Wilson, of Porcupine Tree] here?

Yes, Steven was here for the record.

He’s a pretty hands-on guy?

Oh yeah, definitely.

Was there much collaboration or back-and-forth in the session or did you work alone?

I think pretty much they let me work. You know, Steven liked what he was hearing so… we seemed to like the same things, so sometimes you just click that way with clients. I don’t really remember too much back and forth, there was more of that on the next record, Deadwing.

What was working on that record like?

Well, in contrast to In Absentia, Deadwing is an example of how records are made today, where the band doesn’t go into any studio, they record and mix it at home. Steven mentioned they were working this way pretty early on, and so I sent him an email and said ‘Well, if you’re going to do work that way, the hip thing to do is to mix in subgroups. We’ll rent a nice analog summing amp and we’ll put it all together once you get here.” So he ended up sending over his Mac with his Logic [Apple’s suite of recording programs] sessions on them, and then I rented the Dangerous Music summing amp and we put it all together that way.

Of course Murphy’s law says that if you send your Mac to a foreign country a week in advance it’s going to arrive at the END of the first day of the session you booked. So it was evening before I ran through a couple songs and mastered them quick, keeping the same kind of hands-off mastering mentality that I had with the first record. Because the first record… the mixes were so great that I didn’t have to do much.

But when I heard what I had done the next morning in my car I freaked out. I thought “oh my god this is horrible… is my system broken?!” When I got to the studio I checked it out in the other mastering rooms and I found out that nothing was broken; it just plain sucked. I didn’t roll off enough bottom. Once I started listening to the individual parts [in Logic] I thought, “gee that bass is awful thick… what’s going on there?” There were like five layers of kick drums going on [laughs] — too much to get the kind of clarity we needed. Since we had the option to change the mixes in Logic, that’s what we did.

Porcupine Tree Deadwing album coverThat day we pulled out In Absentia because we knew that people were going to compare the new record to it — and we could use it as a reference, even though the new stuff was recorded so differently. The new one would be its own entity — its own art — but it did have to compare on some kind of level. Once we did that things went much better and all of the changes that we made to the stereo mixes held up through the surround mixes.

How many stems did you output from Logic?

We broke it out to 8 channels, probably 4 stereo stems and stuck that through the analog summing amp.

And what does the summing amp do?

The final squish to stereo is done in the analog domain as opposed to the digital domain.

What’s the effect of using it?

It’s the depth thing. When you close your eyes how deep is the sound stage? I had done comparisons both ways [through the summing amp and not] and switching back and forth I could hear a much deeper sound field than the mixes that had come straight out of the digital domain.

And out of that you went into your…

Andy VanDette

My standard mastering rig. Because the mix issues were taken care of in Logic, that meant I didn’t have to do as much — there were no contortions anymore because anything that I would have struggled with were ironed out.

Do you know why they decided to record Deadwing like they did, rather than do another record like In Absentia? Was it budget?

I think that they were just so adept at recording themselves. Gavin [Harrison, the group’s drummer] had his own studio — why not do drums in his room where he has them all set up just the way he likes them? And Steven is very adept at recording himself — he had done it all those years before Atlantic. And yeah it was partially budgetary because the budget wasn’t as big for Deadwing as it was for In Absentia. The record companies had started tightening their belts by then and… although In Absentia was a great critical success I don’t think it sold numbers that turned heads at Atlantic records.

Deadwing was the last Porcupine Tree record you did?

Right, and then they did Fear of a Blank Planet [Roadrunner Records, 2007] which Steven mastered himself. And then I submitted for their latest record [The Incident, 2009].

But you didn’t end up mastering it?

No, I didn’t. I did master Steven’s solo record Insurgentes [2008] though.

What was the process of mastering Insurgentes?

It was about wrestling with the loudest sections of the record. Which are only 5% of the record but the 5% that I hold the most dear. The quiet parts were all nicely dynamic but when those really ultra loud sections come out the mixes had a screechy distorted quality that made me want to turn my monitors down, not up. So I worked on warming those sections and treating those sections so that they sounded raucously loud, but not abrasive.

Is that EQ work?

Some EQ work, some cutting different settings together. Sometimes you can make one setting and it works for the whole record. But we can get more forensic than that and use different treatments so that when it goes to the ultra loud section you can’t really notice that I’ve changed settings — or at least you’re not supposed to!

And Steven was happy with it?

I think so.

But you didn’t do the next Porcupine Tree record.

Well, one of the guys in the band was very concerned about compression — he wanted to make sure the new record didn’t have too much compression on it. So the group felt that they needed to be there for the mastering, but they weren’t going to be able to come to the States, so that was that. But Steven let me submit, which was cool. So I listened to a lot of In Absentia because I still say it is the Porcupine Tree record by which all other Porcupine Tree records will be judged… and I made something that was just a little lower [in level].

And what happened?

And pretty quickly I got word back that it was way over-compressed. So then I did one that was hardly compressed at all, but I guess I went too far in the other direction… In the end they were right, they needed to be there at the mastering studio so they could find the exact balance they were looking for.

The two albums you did for Porcupine Tree are big ones as far as fans are concerned. Do you get artists that come to you because you did those records?

Certainly.

Have you been doing much in the prog rock area lately?

Oh sure. The Heart of Cygnus CD that’s on my wall [Over Mountain Under Hill] is a recent one… it was named on Mike Portnoy’s [former drummer with Dream Theater] Top 10 list for 2009. And I’ve been doing some things more recently that aren’t out yet.


Thanks to Larry Crane of Tape Op for getting us the Steven Wilson quote when none of us could find our Sep/Oct 2009 copies of Tape Op! (Murphy’s law again.)

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This Month in Masterdisk History: September (Part 1)

If you’ve followed us on Twitter or on our Facebook page, you’ll be familiar with what is alternately called “Today in Masterdisk History” or “Masterdisk Flashback!” (usually depending on how many Twitter characters I have to spare).

These little updates feature records from the past — some near, some far — that were mastered here at Masterdisk. Consider it a very random reminder of some records you might have forgotten about. Or, if you’re in a more heavy mindset, be amazed at how time flies!

I’m surprised at how many of these records have articles at Wikipedia — I link to them when they do. There’s often some interesting minutia on offer.

So here’s six records mastered at Masterdisk from Septembers past!

Blueprint 31 YEAR AGO
Jay-Z “The Blueprint 3”
(Roc Nation/Atlantic, 9/8/09)
Mastered by Tony Dawsey at Masterdisk.
Wikipedia: The Blueprint 3

Chris Potter3 YEARS AGO
Chris Potter Underground “Follow the Red Line: Live at the Village Vanguard”
(Sunnyside, 9/11/07)
Mastered by Scott Hull at Masterdisk.
Wikipedia: Chris Potter

Room for Squares9 YEARS AGO
John Mayer “Room for Squares”
(Aware Records (original release)/Columbia (re-release), 9/18/01)
Mastered by Scott Hull at Masterdisk.
Wikipedia: Room for Squares

Bone Machine18 YEARS AGO
Tom Waits “Bone Machine”
(Island Records, 9/8/92)
Mastered at Masterdisk.
Wikipedia: Bone Machine

Louder Than Love21 YEARS AGO
Soundgarden “Louder Than Love”
(A&M, 9/12/89)
Mastered by Howie Weinberg at Masterdisk.
Wikipedia: Louder Than Love

Signals28 YEARS AGO
Rush “Signals”
(Anthem/Mercury, 9/9/82)
Mastered at Masterdisk.
Wikipedia: Signals